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Richard E. Cavazos

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Richard Edward Cavazos (January 31, 1929 – October 29, 2017) was a United States Army four-star normal. He was a Korean War recipient of the Distinguished Service Cross as a primary lieutenant and superior in rank to develop into the United States Army’s first Hispanic four-star normal.[1] During the Vietnam War, as a lieutenant colonel, Cavazos was awarded a second Distinguished Service Cross. In 1976, Cavazos grew to become the primary Mexican American to achieve the rank of brigadier normal within the United States Army.[2] Cavazos served for thirty-three years, along with his last command as head of the United States Army Forces Command.

In 1982, Cavazos once more made army historical past by being appointed the military’s first Hispanic four-star normal.[1] The identical 12 months, Cavazos assumed command of the United States Army Forces Command. His early assist for the National Training Center and his involvement within the improvement of the Battle Command Training Program enormously influenced the warfare preventing capabilities of the United States Army.[10]

In 1976, Cavazos grew to become the primary Hispanic to achieve the rank of brigadier normal within the United States Army.[2] In 1980, he grew to become commander of III Corps — and is acknowledged for his progressive management of the Corps.[10]

After Vietnam, Cavazos served as commander of the 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, and commander, ninth Infantry Division.

On December 17, 1967, per General Orders No. 6479, Lieutenant Colonel Cavazos was awarded his second Distinguished Service Cross for his actions on October 30, 1967. His quotation reads:

In February 1967, Cavazos, then a lieutenant colonel, grew to become commander of the first Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment.[1] In October and November 1967, his battalion was engaged in preventing close to the Cambodian border. During an assault at Loc Ninh in October 1967, his unit was in a position to repulse the enemy. For his valiant management at Loc Ninh, he was awarded a second Distinguished Service Cross.

On September 10, 1953, per General Orders No. 832, Cavazos was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions throughout the Korean War. His quotation reads:

On February 25, 1953, Cavazos’ Company E was attacked by the enemy. During the struggle towards a numerically superior enemy pressure, Cavazos distinguished himself and obtained the Silver Star for his actions. His firm was in a position to emerge victorious from the battle.[2] On June 14, 1953, Cavazos once more distinguished himself throughout an assault on Hill 142, and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his heroic actions on that day.[2]

During the Korean War, as a member of the sixty fifth Infantry Regiment, a unit of principally natives of Puerto Rico, he distinguished himself, receiving each the Silver Star and Distinguished Service Cross for his heroic actions.

Richard Cavazos, a Mexican-American,[3] was born on January 31, 1929, in Kingsville, Texas. His brother is former United States Secretary of Education, Lauro Cavazos.[4] He then earned a Bachelor of Science diploma in geology from Texas Technological College (now Texas Tech University) in 1951, the place he performed on the soccer group and was a distinguished graduate of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps program.[5][6] He obtained additional army training on the Command and General Staff College, the British Army Staff College, the Armed Forces Staff College, and the United States Army War College.[7] He obtained fundamental officer coaching at Fort Benning, Georgia, adopted by coaching at Airborne School. He then deployed to Korea with the sixty fifth Infantry.

October 29, 2017(2017-10-29) (aged 88)
San Antonio, Texas

October 29, 2017(2017-10-29) (aged 88)
San Antonio, Texas

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